Grant Opportunities

AASLD/LIFER Clinical and Translational Research Fellowship in Liver Diseases Award

ScanGrants™ / All Announcements - Mon, 2014-07-07 10:05

AASLD/LIFER Clinical and Translational Research Fellowship in Liver Diseases Award

Application Deadline: Thursday, December 4 11:59 PM EST

You must be an American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) member to apply for this award. Applicants who are not members are encouraged to apply for AASLD membership no later than September 30, 2014 to ensure your membership is active by the award submission deadline.

The AASLD/LIFER Clinical and Translational Research Fellowship in Liver Diseases Award is a one-year award of $75,000 intended to foster career development for an individual outside North America to perform clinical research within the United States in a liver-related area and who has shown commitment to excellence at an early stage of his or her research study. The award ensures that a significant portion of a young investigator's time is protected for research, with an overall objective of enabling the investigator to develop an independent and productive research career in liver disease.

Applicants to the AASLD/LIFER Clinical and Translational Research Fellowship must be based outside of the United States at the time of application submission; the US based fellowship may not start prior to July 1, 2015 at the sponsoring institution.

Applicants to the AASLD/LIFER Clinical and Translational Research Fellowship must be based outside of the United States at the time of application submission; the US based fellowship may not start prior to July 1, 2015 at the sponsoring institution.

ELIGIBILITY

In order to be eligible for this award, the applicant must adhere to the following guidelines:

1.  Applicant must possess a doctoral degree, either an MD or equivalent and/or a PhD from an
     institution outside North America.

2.  At the start of the award period, MD applicants must be within four years of completing clinical   
     residency or fellowship training (whichever ends more recently), and PhD applicants must be
     within four years of the receipt of the degree.

    (A parental leave of absence can not be counted towards the four years of eligibility.)

3.  Prior to submission, applicant must identify a sponsoring U.S. institution and a research mentor that
     is an AASLD member who agrees in writing to supervise his or her research.

4.  Applicant must have a student or trainee Visa to the U.S.

5.  Project is clinical. "Clinical Research" is defined as studies related to patients or disease
     processes having direct contact between the principal investigator and humans. Clinical research
     includes epidemiology and clinical trials in liver disease. At least 50 percent effort should be
     devoted to research activities.

6.  Applicant is a member of AASLD.

7.  All applications must be in English.

8.  Applicant may only apply for one (1) AASLD award.

AWARD  DETAILS

Award period:  July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016

One award of $75,000 will be provided for one year. Funds may only be used for salary support or technical support/laboratory supplies for the investigator. No indirect costs are provided. It is expected that additional funds are available to the applicant in order to carry out the proposed research.    

Funds will be issued to the recipient's institution and are not transferable to another recipient or another institution. AASLD must approve any award transfer to an institution other than the sponsoring institution listed on the application.

Final Reports

Scientific progress and financial reports must be sent to AASLD within 60 days of completion of the award.

The Liver Meeting

The award recipient is strongly encouraged to both attend and present their work at The Liver Meeting.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Candidates will be evaluated based upon their background, their commitment to a research career, the strength of their research project and the environment in which they will conduct this project.

Applications will be reviewed based on the written materials submitted. Incomplete applications and applications that fail to adhere strictly to the instructions (including the submission deadline and page limitations) will not be reviewed. All decisions are final.

The application deadline for this award is 11:59 PM EST, December 4, 2014.

Applicants may only submit for one (1) AASLD award or fellowship per year.

Questions may be sent to awards@aasld.org.

Advanced/Transplant Hepatology Fellowship Program

ScanGrants™ / All Announcements - Mon, 2014-07-07 09:52

Advanced/Transplant Hepatology Fellowship Program

Application Deadline: Thursday, December 4 11:59 PM EST

You must be an American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) member to apply for this award. Applicants who are not members are encouraged to apply for AASLD membership no later than September 30, 2014 to ensure your membership is active by the award submission deadline.

The Advanced/Transplant Hepatology Fellowship program provides $60,000 in salary and benefit support for GI fellows pursuing an additional, full-year of training focused on patient care in advanced/transplant hepatology. The intent of the program is to prepare the trainee to be eligible for certification in transplant hepatology by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and/or the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). 

ELIGIBILITY

In order to be eligible for this fellowship, the applicant must meet the following criteria:

The applicant must be a member of AASLD at the time of award application and maintain active membership for the duration of the award period. Applicants who are not members are encouraged to apply for AASLD membership no later than September 30, 2014 to ensure their membership is active by the award submission deadline.

For the duration of the fellowship period the applicant must have a faculty mentor who is active in hepatology at the applicant’s sponsoring institution; faculty mentor must be member of AASLD in good standing.

The applicant must complete his/her GI fellowship training (at an ACGME approved institution) in the U.S. by July 1, 2015.

The sponsoring institution must have a United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) approved liver transplant program, which must be in good standing and must perform at least 10 liver transplantations per year. The program must have a full-time faculty member or members capable of teaching a curriculum with a broad-base of knowledge in transplant medicine and hepatology. The program must provide training in living donor transplantation.

The applicant is a citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. or recipient of a student or trainee Visa to the U.S.

The fellowship is strictly for an additional year of clinical hepatology fellowship training and the applicant may not be faculty during the fellowship period.

The applicant will not hold other, similar, fellowship awards during the fellowship period.

A single sponsoring institution may submit up to one application for each accredited ACGME transplant hepatology training program; in the case of a multi-institutional ACGME-accredited transplant hepatology training program, only one application may be submitted by that program.

Applicant may only submit for one (1) AASLD award or Fellowship.

FELLOWSHIP DETAILS

Fellowship period:  July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016

The fellowship funding may only be used for the recipient's salary and benefit support.  Funding will be paid directly to the recipient’s institution. Total funding is $60,000 (up to 8% may be used to support benefits).

Fellowship cannot be transferred to another institution and recipient cannot change mentors without prior written approval from AASLD. Final activity and financial reports are due to AASLD by August 31, 2016 and are not considered confidential. The recipient's institution will be notified of reports that are not received in a timely manner.

Recipient is expected to attend the 66th Annual Meeting in San Francisco and has the option to also attend Digestive Disease Week® 2016 in San Diego. Travel-related expenses incurred to attend the Annual Meeting and Digestive Disease Week® will be reimbursed up to $2,000 per meeting and according to guidelines provided prior to each meeting.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Candidates will be evaluated based upon their background and their commitment to a career in adult or pediatric clinical hepatology. Specifically, candidates will be reviewed based on:

Professional potential of the applicant

Experience, productivity, and commitment of the faculty mentor(s)

Clinical and/or academic environment

Quality of proposed clinical program

AASLD will review the applications and select recipients of the fellowship. Applications will be reviewed based only on the written materials submitted. All decisions are final. Incomplete applications and applications that fail to adhere strictly to the instructions (including the submission deadline and page limitations) will not be reviewed.

The application deadline for this fellowship is 11:59 PM EST, December 4, 2014.

Applicants may only submit for one (1) AASLD award or fellowship per year.

Questions may be sent to awards@aasld.org.

Call for Applications: Endocrine Society Early Investigators Awards

ScanGrants™ / All Announcements - Mon, 2014-07-07 09:33

Call for Applications: Endocrine Society Early Investigators Awards

The Early Investigators Awards provide monetary support to assist in the development of early career investigators and recognition of their accomplishments in endocrine research. Recipients receive a monetary award, one-year complimentary membership to the Society, one-year complimentary access to the Society's online journals, and public recognition of research accomplishments in the recipients' home town and various Society mediums.

Applications are now being accepted for the 2014 Early Investigators Award supported by Pfizer, Inc. Applicants for this award must be conducting research in the area of menopause.

Application Period: May 15 - July 21, 2014

Eligibility Criteria

Hold an MD, PhD, or MD/PhD

Be a newly-appointed faculty within 10 years from the terminal degree granting date

Only one nomination per research mentor

Application Process

Completed Online Nomination Form

Verification of training status (i.e. copy of degree or certificate) 

Nominee's CV or biosketch

Summary of the endocrine-related research conducted by the nominee (2 page maximum) and copy of top publications

Two (2) letters of recommendation from research mentor or department chair

Willingness to write an article for a future edition of the Trainee Corner in Endocrine News

The 2014 Early Investigators Awards are supported by the Endocrine Society and Pfizer, Inc.

Questions?

Contact us at awards@endocrine.org.

National Maritime Heritage Grant Program

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: P14AS00161 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: GrantCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 15.946Eligible Applicants State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher educationAgency Name: DOI-NPSClosing Date: Sep 23, 2014Award Ceiling: $200,000Expected Number of Awards: Creation Date: Jul 02, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Approximately $1.7 million in National Maritime Heritage Grants for education or preservation projects are available for 2014. Proposals for grants will be accepted from June 23 until September 23, 2014. Education projects can request $25,000-50,000 and preservation projects can request $50,000-200,000. Funding for Maritime Heritage Grants is competitive. Project grants are administered through the Maritime Heritage Program and State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs).

Expanding Economic Ties with Turkey Project

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-111-14-000005 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Agriculture
Regional DevelopmentCFDA Number: 98.001Eligible Applicants Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: USAID-ARMClosing Date: Jun 12, 2014Award Ceiling: $500,000Expected Number of Awards: 2Creation Date: May 07, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: The goal of this activity is to promote mutually beneficial economic partnerships and market linkages between Armenian and Turkish non-governmental counterparts/stakeholders in the targeted sectors of agribusiness or tourism.

BLM OR/WA - The Pacific Northwest Regional Infrastructure Team (PNWRIT)

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: L14AS00094 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Natural ResourcesCFDA Number: 15.231Eligible Applicants Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher educationAgency Name: DOI-BLMClosing Date: Jun 06, 2014Award Ceiling: $47,000Expected Number of Awards: 1Creation Date: May 07, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: The PNWRIT is a federal-state partnership in the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington to create an inter-agency forum where the federal and state governments can advance common infrastructure goals in the region.

Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (R24)

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-GM-15-002 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: GrantCategory of Funding Activity: HealthCFDA Number: 93.859
Eligible Applicants State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Special district governments
Independent school districts
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Small businesses
Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: HHS-NIH11Closing Date: Oct 07, 2014Award Ceiling: $1,600,000Expected Number of Awards: 1Creation Date: May 07, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) offers support for a high impact pharmacogenomics knowledge base as a research resource available to the entire scientific community. There is an existing Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base, PharmGKB, and it is the intention of NIGMS to continue one knowledge base. This is an open competition and any qualified applicants are invited to respond. Advance consultation with staff to ensure that a proposed resource fits well with this opportunity is highly encouraged.

NIMHD Social, Behavioral, Health Services, and Policy Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R01)

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-MD-14-004 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: GrantCategory of Funding Activity: HealthCFDA Number: 93.307
Eligible Applicants State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Special district governments
Independent school districts
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Small businesses
Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: HHS-NIH11Closing Date: Aug 28, 2014Award Ceiling: $250,000Expected Number of Awards: Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to solicit innovative social, behavioral, health services, and policy research that can directly and demonstrably contribute to the elimination of health disparities. Projects may involve primary data collection or secondary analysis of existing datasets. Projects that examine understudied health conditions; examine the effectiveness of interventions, services, or policies for multiple health disparity populations; and/or directly measure the impact of project activities on levels of health disparities are particularly encouraged.

FY 2014 Community Assistance Program - State Support Services Element - Region 6

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-MT-023-006-99 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 97.023Eligible Applicants Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: DHS-DHS-R6Closing Date: Jul 01, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 52Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Program Overview and Priorities a. Program Overview The Community Assistance Program ? State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) program provides funding to States to provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and to evaluate community performance in implementing NFIP floodplain management activities. b. Program Priorities In Fiscal Year 2014, the CAP-SSSE program will focus on compliance and enforcement. While map adoption, disaster activities, training and other assistance activities remain important components of the program?s overall community assistance strategy, a credible compliance and enforcement program is essential to meet the program?s goals of flood loss reduction. CAP-SSSE Eligible Activities and Requirements FEMA Regional Offices are to determine the appropriate levels of effort in each activity to ensure that performance metrics are being met. FEMA is requiring certain measures, and encouraging others, for some of the CAP-SSSE activities as described below. 1. Community Assistance Visits (CAV) and Community Assistance Contacts (CAC): States participating in CAP-SSSE are required to conduct CAVs and CACs. States will be required to incorporate the risk-based prioritization as described in the National Flood Insurance Program Guidance for Conducting Community Assistance Contacts and Community Assistance Visits. The Regions will work with each State to determine the number of CAVs and CACs to be conducted and to ensure that selection is based on the risk-based approach described above. Regions and States are encouraged to make maximum use of the CAC process and other contacts with communities to identify potential compliance problems and needs for technical assistance. The document also provides guidance in planning for, conducting and providing follow-up for these activities. States must provide appropriate follow-up to CAVs and CACs by providing technical assistance to correct program deficiencies and remedy violations to the maximum extent possible. States must coordinate with Regions, as necessary, to clarify what follow-up is to be provided. States are expected to refer community compliance problems that they are unable to resolve to the Regional Office. Headquarters staff will also be available for training at Regional CAP Conferences. All CAVs and CACs must be entered into CIS so that FEMA can monitor this important floodplain management activity. 2. Ordinance Assistance: Assisting communities in reviewing local ordinances to ensure compliance with NFIP requirements and adoption before Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) become effective is of paramount importance. This includes necessary ordinance revisions based upon new hazard data provided by FEMA, as well as incorporating any regulatory changes to meet minimum floodplain management criteria. State Cooperative Agreements shall include a performance measure relating to map adoption. The metric will measure the percentage of participating communities that have an adopted ordinance referencing the updated map by the FIRM effective date. States must include a mandatory map adoption rate of 93% or higher into their cooperative agreement. 3. Strategic Planning: Strategic Planning is an optional task and provides an opportunity to assess the current status of a State program and plan for future year demands, find efficiencies, and explore opportunities for expanded services. In cooperation with FEMA, the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) has developed a guidance document for strategic planning within State floodplain management programs. The guidance document can be found at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm and www.floods.org. 4. CAP Gap Analysis: States may optionally choose to conduct an annual gap analysis by using the CAP GAP tool provided at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm. The data collected in the annual analyses has been used to create budget justifications for the current funding. States who believe they may benefit from providing a more refined or revised GAP analysis may optionally submit this to the Region for future year consideration. The GAP analysis is also an important part of the strategic planning process and can be utilized by States in their planning efforts. 5. State Model Ordinance Updates and Monitoring of State Regulatory Environment: Most States have developed a State model floodplain management ordinance containing the minimum requirements outlined in 44 CFR Section 60.3, as well as any State required floodplain management provisions. In addition, States are encouraged to offer their communities model ordinances that include higher regulatory standards and assist communities to update their model ordinances to include higher standards. States are also encouraged to monitor legal issues affecting floodplain management regulations and activities related to State building code adoption and modifications. a. Model Building Codes: Many States adopt a building code that is based on one or more of the model codes developed by the International Code Council (the I-Codes) or the National Fire Protection Association. Most States require all or some communities to enforce the code. Unless modified by a State, the model codes contain NFIP-consistent provisions for buildings and structures. FEMA and States must ensure an understanding of the implications that the enforcement of these codes have on the local regulatory environment in order to provide accurate technical assistance. States should review their model ordinances and work with communities to ensure that they understand the implications of these codes and how they are enforced with respect to NFIP requirements. A model companion ordinance designed specifically to coordinate with building codes based on the I-Codes will be provided to the Regional Offices. State NFIP coordinators should coordinate with their counterparts in the State code commission or State agency that is responsible for the building code, especially with respect to interpretations that the code commission or State agency may be asked to issue. The Building Science Branch at FEMA Headquarters is available upon request to provide training on the flood provisions of the International Codes at Regional CAP Conferences. 6. Outreach, Workshops, and Other Training: States are encouraged to conduct outreach, workshops, and other training for local officials and other stakeholders, including insurance agents, lenders, adjustors, realtors, land surveyors, and design professionals to support implementation and enforcement of community floodplain management regulations, promotion of hazard identification, providing NFIP insurance training, and support of local and State planning initiatives. States should conduct workshops and other training and outreach opportunities on a schedule and at locations that are coordinated with the FEMA Region. Other Training a. ASFPM Activities and Credentialing: FEMA encourages State floodplain management personnel to attain Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) credentials. State employees that are involved in floodplain management activities may use CAP-SSSE funds for costs associated with the initial exam and biennial CFM renewal fees. States are further encouraged to sponsor and proctor CFM exams in coordination with the ASFPM. Note: CAP- SSSE funding cannot be used to reimburse Individual ASFPM membership fees. At the discretion of the Region, States may use limited CAP-SSSE funding to allow local officials to attend and/or assist with the annual ASFPM conference held within their State. These costs must be negotiated with the Region as part of the annual agreement. b. CAP-SSSE funds may be used to reimburse travel costs associated with attendance by State floodplain management personnel at the ASFPM National Conference, FEMA Regional Office CAP-SSSE Coordination Meetings, and in-State Silver Jackets coordination meetings. Other national and regional meetings related to floodplain management may be considered for reimbursement if approved in advance by Regional Office CAP-SSSE staff. 7. General Technical Assistance: States should provide general technical assistance to communities and individuals to resolve floodplain management issues related to the NFIP. 8. Enrollment of Communities: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP by providing technical assistance to ensure the community meets the minimum eligibility requirements for participation. 9. Community Rating System (CRS) Support: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) through providing general technical assistance, conducting entry CAVs and providing support for activities credited by CRS. 10. Mapping Coordination Assistance: As part of the Flood Map Modernization process and the FEMA Risk Map Initiative, States must work with the Regions to develop flood mapping priorities and participate in community meetings held as part of the mapping process. In addition to CAP-SSSE grants, States are eligible for Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program Management funding to meet these responsibilities. The CAP- SSSE plans must be developed separately from, but in coordination with, the CTP Program Management plans to ensure that CTP is used to complement CAP-SSSE activities and that States will meet all of their responsibilities under Flood Map Modernization and Risk Map. Neither CTP Program Management nor CAP-SSSE funds can be used for conducting floodplain studies or developing floodplain maps. However, several activities are allowable under both grant programs, including map adoption, training, and outreach. Use of these resources should be closely coordinated to prevent duplication of effort. 11. Coordination with Other State Programs and Agencies: States are encouraged to coordinate with other State administered programs that impact floodplain management such as the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) that includes: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, and Flood Mitigation Assistance Program. Additional coordination may include the State Dam Safety Program, State land- use, building code and water resources programs, as well as State agencies that routinely conduct activities within floodplains, such as State Departments of Transportation or port authorities. Coordination with other State agencies on adoption and implementation of State Executive Orders and regulations that meet State NFIP requirements is also encouraged. 12. Assistance to Communities in Responding to Disasters: States are encouraged to provide post-disaster assistance and support to NFIP communities. Examples of these activities include: technical assistance implementing substantial damage requirements, including use of the Substantial Damage Estimating Software; assistance to communities enrolling into the NFIP; general floodplain management technical assistance; assistance with the promotion and use of the NFIP Increased Cost of Compliance coverage; and assistance with HMA programs. Generally, these activities are not included in the annual CAP-SSSE Agreement, but can be negotiated when a disaster occurs. The CAP-SSSE Agreement must be modified to reflect these changes when they occur. Selection of CACs and CAVs A risk based approach is intended to help ensure that limited staff resources are applied to the communities most in need of a CAV or CAC in each fiscal year in a cost-effective manner. The selection of CACs and CAVs to be conducted shall continue to use the CAV Tier 1 Prioritization Tool as guidance for determining which communities should receive a CAV. While Selection of CAVs using the Tier 1 tool is required, States and regions may, by exception, select Tier 2 communities for CAVs, with justification added to the CAV Comment Field in the Community Information System (CIS). Special Attention to Mechanical, Electrical, and Utility Equipment and Flood Openings The NFIP Evaluation also concluded that the most common type of violation found in the Study?s quantitative assessment of building compliance were mechanical and utility equipment located below the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and openings that do not meet requirements at 44 CFR 60.3(c)(5). Between them, these two types of violations accounted for 50 percent of the violations found within the sample. To improve enforcement of these requirements, special consideration and attention should be paid to mechanical, utility and openings requirements during CAVs. State CAVs In coordination with the State NFIP Coordinator, Regional Offices may determine that a CAV of the State floodplain management program is appropriate. Regional staff may request assistance with coordination with State agencies or officials, the collection of data and other assistance in preparation of conducting the CAV. c. Program Objectives ? To provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program; and ? To evaluate community performance in implementing National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management activities

NINDS Renewal Awards of SBIR Phase II Grants (Phase IIB) for Pre-Clinical Research (R44)

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-14-209 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: GrantCategory of Funding Activity: HealthCFDA Number: 93.853
Eligible Applicants Small businessesAgency Name: HHS-NIH11Closing Date: May 07, 2017Award Ceiling: Expected Number of Awards: Creation Date: May 07, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that seek additional funding to support the next stage of development for projects requiring approval from a Federal regulatory agency or for those projects developing complex research tools. The FOA aims to facilitate the transition of previously funded SBIR and STTR Phase II projects to the commercialization stage by promoting partnerships between NIHs SBIR/STTR awardees and third-party investors and/or strategic partners. Consistent with the goals of this funding initiative and as required by the SF424 instructions for all SBIR Phase II applications, applicants must submit a Commercialization Plan, which should include details on any independent third-party investor funding that has already been secured or is anticipated during the project period. It is expected that the level of this independent third-party funding will equal or exceed the NINDS funds being requested throughout the SBIR Phase IIB project period.

Community Assistance Program - State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) - Region 8

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-MT-023-008-99 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 97.023Eligible Applicants State governmentsAgency Name: DHS-DHS-R8Closing Date: Jul 01, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 52Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Program Overview and Priorities a. Program Overview The Community Assistance Program ? State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) program provides funding to States to provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and to evaluate community performance in implementing NFIP floodplain management activities. b. Program Priorities In Fiscal Year 2014, the CAP-SSSE program will focus on compliance and enforcement. While map adoption, disaster activities, training and other assistance activities remain important components of the program?s overall community assistance strategy, a credible compliance and enforcement program is essential to meet the program?s goals of flood loss reduction. CAP-SSSE Eligible Activities and Requirements FEMA Regional Offices are to determine the appropriate levels of effort in each activity to ensure that performance metrics are being met. FEMA is requiring certain measures, and encouraging others, for some of the CAP-SSSE activities as described below. 1. Community Assistance Visits (CAV) and Community Assistance Contacts (CAC): States participating in CAP-SSSE are required to conduct CAVs and CACs. States will be required to incorporate the risk-based prioritization as described in the National Flood Insurance Program Guidance for Conducting Community Assistance Contacts and Community Assistance Visits. The Regions will work with each State to determine the number of CAVs and CACs to be conducted and to ensure that selection is based on the risk-based approach described above. Regions and States are encouraged to make maximum use of the CAC process and other contacts with communities to identify potential compliance problems and needs for technical assistance. The document also provides guidance in planning for, conducting and providing follow-up for these activities. States must provide appropriate follow-up to CAVs and CACs by providing technical assistance to correct program deficiencies and remedy violations to the maximum extent possible. States must coordinate with Regions, as necessary, to clarify what follow-up is to be provided. States are expected to refer community compliance problems that they are unable to resolve to the Regional Office. Headquarters staff will also be available for training at Regional CAP Conferences. All CAVs and CACs must be entered into CIS so that FEMA can monitor this important floodplain management activity. 2. Ordinance Assistance: Assisting communities in reviewing local ordinances to ensure compliance with NFIP requirements and adoption before Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) become effective is of paramount importance. This includes necessary ordinance revisions based upon new hazard data provided by FEMA, as well as incorporating any regulatory changes to meet minimum floodplain management criteria. State Cooperative Agreements shall include a performance measure relating to map adoption. The metric will measure the percentage of participating communities that have an adopted ordinance referencing the updated map by the FIRM effective date. States must include a mandatory map adoption rate of 93% or higher into their cooperative agreement. 3. Strategic Planning: Strategic Planning is an optional task and provides an opportunity to assess the current status of a State program and plan for future year demands, find efficiencies, and explore opportunities for expanded services. In cooperation with FEMA, the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) has developed a guidance document for strategic planning within State floodplain management programs. The guidance document can be found at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm and www.floods.org. 4. CAP Gap Analysis: States may optionally choose to conduct an annual gap analysis by using the CAP GAP tool provided at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm. The data collected in the annual analyses has been used to create budget justifications for the current funding. States who believe they may benefit from providing a more refined or revised GAP analysis may optionally submit this to the Region for future year consideration. The GAP analysis is also an important part of the strategic planning process and can be utilized by States in their planning efforts. 5. State Model Ordinance Updates and Monitoring of State Regulatory Environment: Most States have developed a State model floodplain management ordinance containing the minimum requirements outlined in 44 CFR Section 60.3, as well as any State required floodplain management provisions. In addition, States are encouraged to offer their communities model ordinances that include higher regulatory standards and assist communities to update their model ordinances to include higher standards. States are also encouraged to monitor legal issues affecting floodplain management regulations and activities related to State building code adoption and modifications. a. Model Building Codes: Many States adopt a building code that is based on one or more of the model codes developed by the International Code Council (the I-Codes) or the National Fire Protection Association. Most States require all or some communities to enforce the code. Unless modified by a State, the model codes contain NFIP-consistent provisions for buildings and structures. FEMA and States must ensure an understanding of the implications that the enforcement of these codes have on the local regulatory environment in order to provide accurate technical assistance. States should review their model ordinances and work with communities to ensure that they understand the implications of these codes and how they are enforced with respect to NFIP requirements. A model companion ordinance designed specifically to coordinate with building codes based on the I-Codes will be provided to the Regional Offices. State NFIP coordinators should coordinate with their counterparts in the State code commission or State agency that is responsible for the building code, especially with respect to interpretations that the code commission or State agency may be asked to issue. The Building Science Branch at FEMA Headquarters is available upon request to provide training on the flood provisions of the International Codes at Regional CAP Conferences. 6. Outreach, Workshops, and Other Training: States are encouraged to conduct outreach, workshops, and other training for local officials and other stakeholders, including insurance agents, lenders, adjustors, realtors, land surveyors, and design professionals to support implementation and enforcement of community floodplain management regulations, promotion of hazard identification, providing NFIP insurance training, and support of local and State planning initiatives. States should conduct workshops and other training and outreach opportunities on a schedule and at locations that are coordinated with the FEMA Region. Other Training a. ASFPM Activities and Credentialing: FEMA encourages State floodplain management personnel to attain Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) credentials. State employees that are involved in floodplain management activities may use CAP-SSSE funds for costs associated with the initial exam and biennial CFM renewal fees. States are further encouraged to sponsor and proctor CFM exams in coordination with the ASFPM. Note: CAP- SSSE funding cannot be used to reimburse Individual ASFPM membership fees. At the discretion of the Region, States may use limited CAP-SSSE funding to allow local officials to attend and/or assist with the annual ASFPM conference held within their State. These costs must be negotiated with the Region as part of the annual agreement. b. CAP-SSSE funds may be used to reimburse travel costs associated with attendance by State floodplain management personnel at the ASFPM National Conference, FEMA Regional Office CAP-SSSE Coordination Meetings, and in-State Silver Jackets coordination meetings. Other national and regional meetings related to floodplain management may be considered for reimbursement if approved in advance by Regional Office CAP-SSSE staff. 7. General Technical Assistance: States should provide general technical assistance to communities and individuals to resolve floodplain management issues related to the NFIP. 8. Enrollment of Communities: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP by providing technical assistance to ensure the community meets the minimum eligibility requirements for participation. 9. Community Rating System (CRS) Support: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) through providing general technical assistance, conducting entry CAVs and providing support for activities credited by CRS. 10. Mapping Coordination Assistance: As part of the Flood Map Modernization process and the FEMA Risk Map Initiative, States must work with the Regions to develop flood mapping priorities and participate in community meetings held as part of the mapping process. In addition to CAP-SSSE grants, States are eligible for Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program Management funding to meet these responsibilities. The CAP- SSSE plans must be developed separately from, but in coordination with, the CTP Program Management plans to ensure that CTP is used to complement CAP-SSSE activities and that States will meet all of their responsibilities under Flood Map Modernization and Risk Map. Neither CTP Program Management nor CAP-SSSE funds can be used for conducting floodplain studies or developing floodplain maps. However, several activities are allowable under both grant programs, including map adoption, training, and outreach. Use of these resources should be closely coordinated to prevent duplication of effort. 11. Coordination with Other State Programs and Agencies: States are encouraged to coordinate with other State administered programs that impact floodplain management such as the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) that includes: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, and Flood Mitigation Assistance Program. Additional coordination may include the State Dam Safety Program, State land-use, building code and water resources programs, as well as State agencies that routinely conduct activities within floodplains, such as State Departments of Transportation or port authorities. Coordination with other State agencies on adoption and implementation of State Executive Orders and regulations that meet State NFIP requirements is also encouraged. 12. Assistance to Communities in Responding to Disasters: States are encouraged to provide post-disaster assistance and support to NFIP communities. Examples of these activities include: technical assistance implementing substantial damage requirements, including use of the Substantial Damage Estimating Software; assistance to communities enrolling into the NFIP; general floodplain management technical assistance; assistance with the promotion and use of the NFIP Increased Cost of Compliance coverage; and assistance with HMA programs. Generally, these activities are not included in the annual CAP-SSSE Agreement, but can be negotiated when a disaster occurs. The CAP-SSSE Agreement must be modified to reflect these changes when they occur. Selection of CACs and CAVs A risk based approach is intended to help ensure that limited staff resources are applied to the communities most in need of a CAV or CAC in each fiscal year in a cost-effective manner. The selection of CACs and CAVs to be conducted shall continue to use the CAV Tier 1 Prioritization Tool as guidance for determining which communities should receive a CAV. While Selection of CAVs using the Tier 1 tool is required, States and regions may, by exception, select Tier 2 communities for CAVs, with justification added to the CAV Comment Field in the Community Information System (CIS). Special Attention to Mechanical, Electrical, and Utility Equipment and Flood Openings The NFIP Evaluation also concluded that the most common type of violation found in the Study?s quantitative assessment of building compliance were mechanical and utility equipment located below the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and openings that do not meet requirements at 44 CFR 60.3(c)(5). Between them, these two types of violations accounted for 50 percent of the violations found within the sample. To improve enforcement of these requirements, special consideration and attention should be paid to mechanical, utility and openings requirements during CAVs. State CAVs In coordination with the State NFIP Coordinator, Regional Offices may determine that a CAV of the State floodplain management program is appropriate. Regional staff may request assistance with coordination with State agencies or officials, the collection of data and other assistance in preparation of conducting the CAV. c. Program Objectives ? To provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program; and ? To evaluate community performance in implementing National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management activities

Domestic Nuclear Detection Office: Academic Research Initiative (ARI)

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-DN-077-ARI-001 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: GrantCategory of Funding Activity: Science and Technology and other Research and DevelopmentCFDA Number: 97.077Eligible Applicants Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher educationAgency Name: DHS-OPOClosing Date: Jun 13, 2014Award Ceiling: $350,000Expected Number of Awards: 8Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: The ARI Program has two primary objectives: 1) Engage the academic community to advance fundamental knowledge for nuclear and radiological threat detection, nuclear forensics and related sciences with emphasis on fundamental research to solve long-term, high-risk challenges and 2) Develop human capital for the nuclear science and engineering profession. Further, the program works to sustain a long-term commitment to basic research in this field and coordinates research efforts across the federal government. The ARI program seeks novel cross-cutting research that will enhance the nation?s ability to detect and interdict nuclear or radiological material outside of regulatory control, and otherwise help prevent nuclear or radiological attacks. This year?s Solicitation topics will emphasize original early-stage research which demonstrates quantifiable improvements over existing methods.

OJJDP FY 2014 Missing and Exploited Children Training and Technical Assistance Program

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: OJJDP-2014-3894 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Law, Justice and Legal ServicesCFDA Number: 16.543Eligible Applicants Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Small businessesAgency Name: USDOJ-OJP-OJJDPClosing Date: Jun 23, 2014Award Ceiling: $2,000,000Expected Number of Awards: 1Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Through this program, OJJDP seeks to develop and implement training and technical assistance on effective responses to missing and exploited children?s issues for multidisciplinary teams of prosecutors, state and local law enforcement, child protection personnel, medical providers, and other child-serving professionals. This program is authorized pursuant to paragraph (6) under the Juvenile Justice heading in the Department of Justice Appropriations Act 2014, P.L. 113-76, 128 Stat. 5, 65.

FY 2014 Community Assistance Program - State Support Services Element - Region 5

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-MT-023-005-99 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 97.023Eligible Applicants Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: DHS-DHS-R5Closing Date: Jul 01, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 52Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Program Overview and Priorities a. Program Overview The Community Assistance Program ? State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) program provides funding to States to provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and to evaluate community performance in implementing NFIP floodplain management activities. b. Program Priorities In Fiscal Year 2014, the CAP-SSSE program will focus on compliance and enforcement. While map adoption, disaster activities, training and other assistance activities remain important components of the program?s overall community assistance strategy, a credible compliance and enforcement program is essential to meet the program?s goals of flood loss reduction. CAP-SSSE Eligible Activities and Requirements FEMA Regional Offices are to determine the appropriate levels of effort in each activity to ensure that performance metrics are being met. FEMA is requiring certain measures, and encouraging others, for some of the CAP-SSSE activities as described below. 1. Community Assistance Visits (CAV) and Community Assistance Contacts (CAC): States participating in CAP-SSSE are required to conduct CAVs and CACs. States will be required to incorporate the risk-based prioritization as described in the National Flood Insurance Program Guidance for Conducting Community Assistance Contacts and Community Assistance Visits. The Regions will work with each State to determine the number of CAVs and CACs to be conducted and to ensure that selection is based on the risk-based approach described above. Regions and States are encouraged to make maximum use of the CAC process and other contacts with communities to identify potential compliance problems and needs for technical assistance. The document also provides guidance in planning for, conducting and providing follow-up for these activities. States must provide appropriate follow-up to CAVs and CACs by providing technical assistance to correct program deficiencies and remedy violations to the maximum extent possible. States must coordinate with Regions, as necessary, to clarify what follow-up is to be provided. States are expected to refer community compliance problems that they are unable to resolve to the Regional Office. Headquarters staff will also be available for training at Regional CAP Conferences. All CAVs and CACs must be entered into CIS so that FEMA can monitor this important floodplain management activity. 2. Ordinance Assistance: Assisting communities in reviewing local ordinances to ensure compliance with NFIP requirements and adoption before Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) become effective is of paramount importance. This includes necessary ordinance revisions based upon new hazard data provided by FEMA, as well as incorporating any regulatory changes to meet minimum floodplain management criteria. State Cooperative Agreements shall include a performance measure relating to map adoption. The metric will measure the percentage of participating communities that have an adopted ordinance referencing the updated map by the FIRM effective date. States must include a mandatory map adoption rate of 93% or higher into their cooperative agreement. 3. Strategic Planning: Strategic Planning is an optional task and provides an opportunity to assess the current status of a State program and plan for future year demands, find efficiencies, and explore opportunities for expanded services. In cooperation with FEMA, the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) has developed a guidance document for strategic planning within State floodplain management programs. The guidance document can be found at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm and www.floods.org. 4. CAP Gap Analysis: States may optionally choose to conduct an annual gap analysis by using the CAP GAP tool provided at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm. The data collected in the annual analyses has been used to create budget justifications for the current funding. States who believe they may benefit from providing a more refined or revised GAP analysis may optionally submit this to the Region for future year consideration. The GAP analysis is also an important part of the strategic planning process and can be utilized by States in their planning efforts. 5. State Model Ordinance Updates and Monitoring of State Regulatory Environment: Most States have developed a State model floodplain management ordinance containing the minimum requirements outlined in 44 CFR Section 60.3, as well as any State required floodplain management provisions. In addition, States are encouraged to offer their communities model ordinances that include higher regulatory standards and assist communities to update their model ordinances to include higher standards. States are also encouraged to monitor legal issues affecting floodplain management regulations and activities related to State building code adoption and modifications. a. Model Building Codes: Many States adopt a building code that is based on one or more of the model codes developed by the International Code Council (the I-Codes) or the National Fire Protection Association. Most States require all or some communities to enforce the code. Unless modified by a State, the model codes contain NFIP-consistent provisions for buildings and structures. FEMA and States must ensure an understanding of the implications that the enforcement of these codes have on the local regulatory environment in order to provide accurate technical assistance. States should review their model ordinances and work with communities to ensure that they understand the implications of these codes and how they are enforced with respect to NFIP requirements. A model companion ordinance designed specifically to coordinate with building codes based on the I-Codes will be provided to the Regional Offices. State NFIP coordinators should coordinate with their counterparts in the State code commission or State agency that is responsible for the building code, especially with respect to interpretations that the code commission or State agency may be asked to issue. The Building Science Branch at FEMA Headquarters is available upon request to provide training on the flood provisions of the International Codes at Regional CAP Conferences. 6. Outreach, Workshops, and Other Training: States are encouraged to conduct outreach, workshops, and other training for local officials and other stakeholders, including insurance agents, lenders, adjustors, realtors, land surveyors, and design professionals to support implementation and enforcement of community floodplain management regulations, promotion of hazard identification, providing NFIP insurance training, and support of local and State planning initiatives. States should conduct workshops and other training and outreach opportunities on a schedule and at locations that are coordinated with the FEMA Region. Other Training a. ASFPM Activities and Credentialing: FEMA encourages State floodplain management personnel to attain Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) credentials. State employees that are involved in floodplain management activities may use CAP-SSSE funds for costs associated with the initial exam and biennial CFM renewal fees. States are further encouraged to sponsor and proctor CFM exams in coordination with the ASFPM. Note: CAP- SSSE funding cannot be used to reimburse Individual ASFPM membership fees. At the discretion of the Region, States may use limited CAP-SSSE funding to allow local officials to attend and/or assist with the annual ASFPM conference held within their State. These costs must be negotiated with the Region as part of the annual agreement. b. CAP-SSSE funds may be used to reimburse travel costs associated with attendance by State floodplain management personnel at the ASFPM National Conference, FEMA Regional Office CAP-SSSE Coordination Meetings, and in-State Silver Jackets coordination meetings. Other national and regional meetings related to floodplain management may be considered for reimbursement if approved in advance by Regional Office CAP-SSSE staff. 7. General Technical Assistance: States should provide general technical assistance to communities and individuals to resolve floodplain management issues related to the NFIP. 8. Enrollment of Communities: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP by providing technical assistance to ensure the community meets the minimum eligibility requirements for participation. 9. Community Rating System (CRS) Support: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) through providing general technical assistance, conducting entry CAVs and providing support for activities credited by CRS. 10. Mapping Coordination Assistance: As part of the Flood Map Modernization process and the FEMA Risk Map Initiative, States must work with the Regions to develop flood mapping priorities and participate in community meetings held as part of the mapping process. In addition to CAP-SSSE grants, States are eligible for Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program Management funding to meet these responsibilities. The CAP- SSSE plans must be developed separately from, but in coordination with, the CTP Program Management plans to ensure that CTP is used to complement CAP-SSSE activities and that States will meet all of their responsibilities under Flood Map Modernization and Risk Map. Neither CTP Program Management nor CAP-SSSE funds can be used for conducting floodplain studies or developing floodplain maps. However, several activities are allowable under both grant programs, including map adoption, training, and outreach. Use of these resources should be closely coordinated to prevent duplication of effort. 11. Coordination with Other State Programs and Agencies: States are encouraged to coordinate with other State administered programs that impact floodplain management such as the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) that includes: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, and Flood Mitigation Assistance Program. Additional coordination may include the State Dam Safety Program, State land- use, building code and water resources programs, as well as State agencies that routinely conduct activities within floodplains, such as State Departments of Transportation or port authorities. Coordination with other State agencies on adoption and implementation of State Executive Orders and regulations that meet State NFIP requirements is also encouraged. 12. Assistance to Communities in Responding to Disasters: States are encouraged to provide post-disaster assistance and support to NFIP communities. Examples of these activities include: technical assistance implementing substantial damage requirements, including use of the Substantial Damage Estimating Software; assistance to communities enrolling into the NFIP; general floodplain management technical assistance; assistance with the promotion and use of the NFIP Increased Cost of Compliance coverage; and assistance with HMA programs. Generally, these activities are not included in the annual CAP-SSSE Agreement, but can be negotiated when a disaster occurs. The CAP-SSSE Agreement must be modified to reflect these changes when they occur. Selection of CACs and CAVs A risk based approach is intended to help ensure that limited staff resources are applied to the communities most in need of a CAV or CAC in each fiscal year in a cost-effective manner. The selection of CACs and CAVs to be conducted shall continue to use the CAV Tier 1 Prioritization Tool as guidance for determining which communities should receive a CAV. While Selection of CAVs using the Tier 1 tool is required, States and regions may, by exception, select Tier 2 communities for CAVs, with justification added to the CAV Comment Field in the Community Information System (CIS). Special Attention to Mechanical, Electrical, and Utility Equipment and Flood Openings The NFIP Evaluation also concluded that the most common type of violation found in the Study?s quantitative assessment of building compliance were mechanical and utility equipment located below the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and openings that do not meet requirements at 44 CFR 60.3(c)(5). Between them, these two types of violations accounted for 50 percent of the violations found within the sample. To improve enforcement of these requirements, special consideration and attention should be paid to mechanical, utility and openings requirements during CAVs. State CAVs In coordination with the State NFIP Coordinator, Regional Offices may determine that a CAV of the State floodplain management program is appropriate. Regional staff may request assistance with coordination with State agencies or officials, the collection of data and other assistance in preparation of conducting the CAV. c. Program Objectives ? To provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program; and ? To evaluate community performance in implementing National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management activities

Community Assistance Program - State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) - Region 9

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-MT-023-009-99 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 97.023Eligible Applicants State governmentsAgency Name: DHS-DHS-R9Closing Date: Jul 01, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 52Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Program Overview and Priorities a. Program Overview The Community Assistance Program ? State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) program provides funding to States to provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and to evaluate community performance in implementing NFIP floodplain management activities. b. Program Priorities In Fiscal Year 2014, the CAP-SSSE program will focus on compliance and enforcement. While map adoption, disaster activities, training and other assistance activities remain important components of the program?s overall community assistance strategy, a credible compliance and enforcement program is essential to meet the program?s goals of flood loss reduction. CAP-SSSE Eligible Activities and Requirements FEMA Regional Offices are to determine the appropriate levels of effort in each activity to ensure that performance metrics are being met. FEMA is requiring certain measures, and encouraging others, for some of the CAP-SSSE activities as described below. 1. Community Assistance Visits (CAV) and Community Assistance Contacts (CAC): States participating in CAP-SSSE are required to conduct CAVs and CACs. States will be required to incorporate the risk-based prioritization as described in the National Flood Insurance Program Guidance for Conducting Community Assistance Contacts and Community Assistance Visits. The Regions will work with each State to determine the number of CAVs and CACs to be conducted and to ensure that selection is based on the risk-based approach described above. Regions and States are encouraged to make maximum use of the CAC process and other contacts with communities to identify potential compliance problems and needs for technical assistance. The document also provides guidance in planning for, conducting and providing follow-up for these activities. States must provide appropriate follow-up to CAVs and CACs by providing technical assistance to correct program deficiencies and remedy violations to the maximum extent possible. States must coordinate with Regions, as necessary, to clarify what follow-up is to be provided. States are expected to refer community compliance problems that they are unable to resolve to the Regional Office. Headquarters staff will also be available for training at Regional CAP Conferences. All CAVs and CACs must be entered into CIS so that FEMA can monitor this important floodplain management activity. 2. Ordinance Assistance: Assisting communities in reviewing local ordinances to ensure compliance with NFIP requirements and adoption before Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) become effective is of paramount importance. This includes necessary ordinance revisions based upon new hazard data provided by FEMA, as well as incorporating any regulatory changes to meet minimum floodplain management criteria. State Cooperative Agreements shall include a performance measure relating to map adoption. The metric will measure the percentage of participating communities that have an adopted ordinance referencing the updated map by the FIRM effective date. States must include a mandatory map adoption rate of 93% or higher into their cooperative agreement. 3. Strategic Planning: Strategic Planning is an optional task and provides an opportunity to assess the current status of a State program and plan for future year demands, find efficiencies, and explore opportunities for expanded services. In cooperation with FEMA, the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) has developed a guidance document for strategic planning within State floodplain management programs. The guidance document can be found at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm and www.floods.org. 4. CAP Gap Analysis: States may optionally choose to conduct an annual gap analysis by using the CAP GAP tool provided at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm. The data collected in the annual analyses has been used to create budget justifications for the current funding. States who believe they may benefit from providing a more refined or revised GAP analysis may optionally submit this to the Region for future year consideration. The GAP analysis is also an important part of the strategic planning process and can be utilized by States in their planning efforts. 5. State Model Ordinance Updates and Monitoring of State Regulatory Environment: Most States have developed a State model floodplain management ordinance containing the minimum requirements outlined in 44 CFR Section 60.3, as well as any State required floodplain management provisions. In addition, States are encouraged to offer their communities model ordinances that include higher regulatory standards and assist communities to update their model ordinances to include higher standards. States are also encouraged to monitor legal issues affecting floodplain management regulations and activities related to State building code adoption and modifications. a. Model Building Codes: Many States adopt a building code that is based on one or more of the model codes developed by the International Code Council (the I-Codes) or the National Fire Protection Association. Most States require all or some communities to enforce the code. Unless modified by a State, the model codes contain NFIP-consistent provisions for buildings and structures. FEMA and States must ensure an understanding of the implications that the enforcement of these codes have on the local regulatory environment in order to provide accurate technical assistance. States should review their model ordinances and work with communities to ensure that they understand the implications of these codes and how they are enforced with respect to NFIP requirements. A model companion ordinance designed specifically to coordinate with building codes based on the I-Codes will be provided to the Regional Offices. State NFIP coordinators should coordinate with their counterparts in the State code commission or State agency that is responsible for the building code, especially with respect to interpretations that the code commission or State agency may be asked to issue. The Building Science Branch at FEMA Headquarters is available upon request to provide training on the flood provisions of the International Codes at Regional CAP Conferences. 6. Outreach, Workshops, and Other Training: States are encouraged to conduct outreach, workshops, and other training for local officials and other stakeholders, including insurance agents, lenders, adjustors, realtors, land surveyors, and design professionals to support implementation and enforcement of community floodplain management regulations, promotion of hazard identification, providing NFIP insurance training, and support of local and State planning initiatives. States should conduct workshops and other training and outreach opportunities on a schedule and at locations that are coordinated with the FEMA Region. Other Training a. ASFPM Activities and Credentialing: FEMA encourages State floodplain management personnel to attain Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) credentials. State employees that are involved in floodplain management activities may use CAP-SSSE funds for costs associated with the initial exam and biennial CFM renewal fees. States are further encouraged to sponsor and proctor CFM exams in coordination with the ASFPM. Note: CAP- SSSE funding cannot be used to reimburse Individual ASFPM membership fees. At the discretion of the Region, States may use limited CAP-SSSE funding to allow local officials to attend and/or assist with the annual ASFPM conference held within their State. These costs must be negotiated with the Region as part of the annual agreement. b. CAP-SSSE funds may be used to reimburse travel costs associated with attendance by State floodplain management personnel at the ASFPM National Conference, FEMA Regional Office CAP-SSSE Coordination Meetings, and in-State Silver Jackets coordination meetings. Other national and regional meetings related to floodplain management may be considered for reimbursement if approved in advance by Regional Office CAP-SSSE staff. 7. General Technical Assistance: States should provide general technical assistance to communities and individuals to resolve floodplain management issues related to the NFIP. 8. Enrollment of Communities: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP by providing technical assistance to ensure the community meets the minimum eligibility requirements for participation. 9. Community Rating System (CRS) Support: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) through providing general technical assistance, conducting entry CAVs and providing support for activities credited by CRS. 10. Mapping Coordination Assistance: As part of the Flood Map Modernization process and the FEMA Risk Map Initiative, States must work with the Regions to develop flood mapping priorities and participate in community meetings held as part of the mapping process. In addition to CAP-SSSE grants, States are eligible for Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program Management funding to meet these responsibilities. The CAP- SSSE plans must be developed separately from, but in coordination with, the CTP Program Management plans to ensure that CTP is used to complement CAP-SSSE activities and that States will meet all of their responsibilities under Flood Map Modernization and Risk Map. Neither CTP Program Management nor CAP-SSSE funds can be used for conducting floodplain studies or developing floodplain maps. However, several activities are allowable under both grant programs, including map adoption, training, and outreach. Use of these resources should be closely coordinated to prevent duplication of effort. 11. Coordination with Other State Programs and Agencies: States are encouraged to coordinate with other State administered programs that impact floodplain management such as the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) that includes: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, and Flood Mitigation Assistance Program. Additional coordination may include the State Dam Safety Program, State land-use, building code and water resources programs, as well as State agencies that routinely conduct activities within floodplains, such as State Departments of Transportation or port authorities. Coordination with other State agencies on adoption and implementation of State Executive Orders and regulations that meet State NFIP requirements is also encouraged. 12. Assistance to Communities in Responding to Disasters: States are encouraged to provide post-disaster assistance and support to NFIP communities. Examples of these activities include: technical assistance implementing substantial damage requirements, including use of the Substantial Damage Estimating Software; assistance to communities enrolling into the NFIP; general floodplain management technical assistance; assistance with the promotion and use of the NFIP Increased Cost of Compliance coverage; and assistance with HMA programs. Generally, these activities are not included in the annual CAP-SSSE Agreement, but can be negotiated when a disaster occurs. The CAP-SSSE Agreement must be modified to reflect these changes when they occur. Selection of CACs and CAVs A risk based approach is intended to help ensure that limited staff resources are applied to the communities most in need of a CAV or CAC in each fiscal year in a cost-effective manner. The selection of CACs and CAVs to be conducted shall continue to use the CAV Tier 1 Prioritization Tool as guidance for determining which communities should receive a CAV. While Selection of CAVs using the Tier 1 tool is required, States and regions may, by exception, select Tier 2 communities for CAVs, with justification added to the CAV Comment Field in the Community Information System (CIS). Special Attention to Mechanical, Electrical, and Utility Equipment and Flood Openings The NFIP Evaluation also concluded that the most common type of violation found in the Study?s quantitative assessment of building compliance were mechanical and utility equipment located below the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and openings that do not meet requirements at 44 CFR 60.3(c)(5). Between them, these two types of violations accounted for 50 percent of the violations found within the sample. To improve enforcement of these requirements, special consideration and attention should be paid to mechanical, utility and openings requirements during CAVs. State CAVs In coordination with the State NFIP Coordinator, Regional Offices may determine that a CAV of the State floodplain management program is appropriate. Regional staff may request assistance with coordination with State agencies or officials, the collection of data and other assistance in preparation of conducting the CAV. c. Program Objectives ? To provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program; and ? To evaluate community performance in implementing National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management activities

Community Assistance Program - State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) - Region 10

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-MT-023-010-99 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 97.023Eligible Applicants State governmentsAgency Name: DHS-DHS-R10Closing Date: Jul 01, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 52Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Program Overview and Priorities a. Program Overview The Community Assistance Program ? State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) program provides funding to States to provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and to evaluate community performance in implementing NFIP floodplain management activities. b. Program Priorities In Fiscal Year 2014, the CAP-SSSE program will focus on compliance and enforcement. While map adoption, disaster activities, training and other assistance activities remain important components of the program?s overall community assistance strategy, a credible compliance and enforcement program is essential to meet the program?s goals of flood loss reduction. CAP-SSSE Eligible Activities and Requirements FEMA Regional Offices are to determine the appropriate levels of effort in each activity to ensure that performance metrics are being met. FEMA is requiring certain measures, and encouraging others, for some of the CAP-SSSE activities as described below. 1. Community Assistance Visits (CAV) and Community Assistance Contacts (CAC): States participating in CAP-SSSE are required to conduct CAVs and CACs. States will be required to incorporate the risk-based prioritization as described in the National Flood Insurance Program Guidance for Conducting Community Assistance Contacts and Community Assistance Visits. The Regions will work with each State to determine the number of CAVs and CACs to be conducted and to ensure that selection is based on the risk-based approach described above. Regions and States are encouraged to make maximum use of the CAC process and other contacts with communities to identify potential compliance problems and needs for technical assistance. The document also provides guidance in planning for, conducting and providing follow-up for these activities. States must provide appropriate follow-up to CAVs and CACs by providing technical assistance to correct program deficiencies and remedy violations to the maximum extent possible. States must coordinate with Regions, as necessary, to clarify what follow-up is to be provided. States are expected to refer community compliance problems that they are unable to resolve to the Regional Office. Headquarters staff will also be available for training at Regional CAP Conferences. All CAVs and CACs must be entered into CIS so that FEMA can monitor this important floodplain management activity. 2. Ordinance Assistance: Assisting communities in reviewing local ordinances to ensure compliance with NFIP requirements and adoption before Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) become effective is of paramount importance. This includes necessary ordinance revisions based upon new hazard data provided by FEMA, as well as incorporating any regulatory changes to meet minimum floodplain management criteria. State Cooperative Agreements shall include a performance measure relating to map adoption. The metric will measure the percentage of participating communities that have an adopted ordinance referencing the updated map by the FIRM effective date. States must include a mandatory map adoption rate of 93% or higher into their cooperative agreement. 3. Strategic Planning: Strategic Planning is an optional task and provides an opportunity to assess the current status of a State program and plan for future year demands, find efficiencies, and explore opportunities for expanded services. In cooperation with FEMA, the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) has developed a guidance document for strategic planning within State floodplain management programs. The guidance document can be found at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm and www.floods.org. 4. CAP Gap Analysis: States may optionally choose to conduct an annual gap analysis by using the CAP GAP tool provided at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm. The data collected in the annual analyses has been used to create budget justifications for the current funding. States who believe they may benefit from providing a more refined or revised GAP analysis may optionally submit this to the Region for future year consideration. The GAP analysis is also an important part of the strategic planning process and can be utilized by States in their planning efforts. 5. State Model Ordinance Updates and Monitoring of State Regulatory Environment: Most States have developed a State model floodplain management ordinance containing the minimum requirements outlined in 44 CFR Section 60.3, as well as any State required floodplain management provisions. In addition, States are encouraged to offer their communities model ordinances that include higher regulatory standards and assist communities to update their model ordinances to include higher standards. States are also encouraged to monitor legal issues affecting floodplain management regulations and activities related to State building code adoption and modifications. a. Model Building Codes: Many States adopt a building code that is based on one or more of the model codes developed by the International Code Council (the I-Codes) or the National Fire Protection Association. Most States require all or some communities to enforce the code. Unless modified by a State, the model codes contain NFIP-consistent provisions for buildings and structures. FEMA and States must ensure an understanding of the implications that the enforcement of these codes have on the local regulatory environment in order to provide accurate technical assistance. States should review their model ordinances and work with communities to ensure that they understand the implications of these codes and how they are enforced with respect to NFIP requirements. A model companion ordinance designed specifically to coordinate with building codes based on the I-Codes will be provided to the Regional Offices. State NFIP coordinators should coordinate with their counterparts in the State code commission or State agency that is responsible for the building code, especially with respect to interpretations that the code commission or State agency may be asked to issue. The Building Science Branch at FEMA Headquarters is available upon request to provide training on the flood provisions of the International Codes at Regional CAP Conferences. 6. Outreach, Workshops, and Other Training: States are encouraged to conduct outreach, workshops, and other training for local officials and other stakeholders, including insurance agents, lenders, adjustors, realtors, land surveyors, and design professionals to support implementation and enforcement of community floodplain management regulations, promotion of hazard identification, providing NFIP insurance training, and support of local and State planning initiatives. States should conduct workshops and other training and outreach opportunities on a schedule and at locations that are coordinated with the FEMA Region. Other Training a. ASFPM Activities and Credentialing: FEMA encourages State floodplain management personnel to attain Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) credentials. State employees that are involved in floodplain management activities may use CAP-SSSE funds for costs associated with the initial exam and biennial CFM renewal fees. States are further encouraged to sponsor and proctor CFM exams in coordination with the ASFPM. Note: CAP- SSSE funding cannot be used to reimburse Individual ASFPM membership fees. At the discretion of the Region, States may use limited CAP-SSSE funding to allow local officials to attend and/or assist with the annual ASFPM conference held within their State. These costs must be negotiated with the Region as part of the annual agreement. b. CAP-SSSE funds may be used to reimburse travel costs associated with attendance by State floodplain management personnel at the ASFPM National Conference, FEMA Regional Office CAP-SSSE Coordination Meetings, and in-State Silver Jackets coordination meetings. Other national and regional meetings related to floodplain management may be considered for reimbursement if approved in advance by Regional Office CAP-SSSE staff. 7. General Technical Assistance: States should provide general technical assistance to communities and individuals to resolve floodplain management issues related to the NFIP. 8. Enrollment of Communities: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP by providing technical assistance to ensure the community meets the minimum eligibility requirements for participation. 9. Community Rating System (CRS) Support: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) through providing general technical assistance, conducting entry CAVs and providing support for activities credited by CRS. 10. Mapping Coordination Assistance: As part of the Flood Map Modernization process and the FEMA Risk Map Initiative, States must work with the Regions to develop flood mapping priorities and participate in community meetings held as part of the mapping process. In addition to CAP-SSSE grants, States are eligible for Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program Management funding to meet these responsibilities. The CAP- SSSE plans must be developed separately from, but in coordination with, the CTP Program Management plans to ensure that CTP is used to complement CAP-SSSE activities and that States will meet all of their responsibilities under Flood Map Modernization and Risk Map. Neither CTP Program Management nor CAP-SSSE funds can be used for conducting floodplain studies or developing floodplain maps. However, several activities are allowable under both grant programs, including map adoption, training, and outreach. Use of these resources should be closely coordinated to prevent duplication of effort. 11. Coordination with Other State Programs and Agencies: States are encouraged to coordinate with other State administered programs that impact floodplain management such as the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) that includes: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, and Flood Mitigation Assistance Program. Additional coordination may include the State Dam Safety Program, State land-use, building code and water resources programs, as well as State agencies that routinely conduct activities within floodplains, such as State Departments of Transportation or port authorities. Coordination with other State agencies on adoption and implementation of State Executive Orders and regulations that meet State NFIP requirements is also encouraged. 12. Assistance to Communities in Responding to Disasters: States are encouraged to provide post-disaster assistance and support to NFIP communities. Examples of these activities include: technical assistance implementing substantial damage requirements, including use of the Substantial Damage Estimating Software; assistance to communities enrolling into the NFIP; general floodplain management technical assistance; assistance with the promotion and use of the NFIP Increased Cost of Compliance coverage; and assistance with HMA programs. Generally, these activities are not included in the annual CAP-SSSE Agreement, but can be negotiated when a disaster occurs. The CAP-SSSE Agreement must be modified to reflect these changes when they occur. Selection of CACs and CAVs A risk based approach is intended to help ensure that limited staff resources are applied to the communities most in need of a CAV or CAC in each fiscal year in a cost-effective manner. The selection of CACs and CAVs to be conducted shall continue to use the CAV Tier 1 Prioritization Tool as guidance for determining which communities should receive a CAV. While Selection of CAVs using the Tier 1 tool is required, States and regions may, by exception, select Tier 2 communities for CAVs, with justification added to the CAV Comment Field in the Community Information System (CIS). Special Attention to Mechanical, Electrical, and Utility Equipment and Flood Openings The NFIP Evaluation also concluded that the most common type of violation found in the Study?s quantitative assessment of building compliance were mechanical and utility equipment located below the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and openings that do not meet requirements at 44 CFR 60.3(c)(5). Between them, these two types of violations accounted for 50 percent of the violations found within the sample. To improve enforcement of these requirements, special consideration and attention should be paid to mechanical, utility and openings requirements during CAVs. State CAVs In coordination with the State NFIP Coordinator, Regional Offices may determine that a CAV of the State floodplain management program is appropriate. Regional staff may request assistance with coordination with State agencies or officials, the collection of data and other assistance in preparation of conducting the CAV. c. Program Objectives ? To provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program; and ? To evaluate community performance in implementing National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management activities

DoD Gulf War Illness New Investigator Award

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: W81XWH-14-GWIRP-NIA Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
GrantCategory of Funding Activity: Science and Technology and other Research and DevelopmentCFDA Number: 12.420Eligible Applicants Unrestricted (i.e., open to any type of entity above), subject to any clarification in text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility"Agency Name: DOD-AMRAAClosing Date: Sep 25, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 2Creation Date: May 07, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: The New Investigator Award (NIA) mechanism is being offered by the GWIRP for the first time in FY14. The intent of the GWIRP NIA is to support investigators new to the field of GWI research at different stages of career development. This award enables such investigators to compete for funding separately from investigators with established programs of GWI research. Previous experience in GWI research is allowed, but not required. However, Principal Investigators (PIs) with a limited background in GWI research are strongly encouraged to strengthen their applications through collaboration with investigators who are experienced in GWI research and/or possess other relevant expertise. It is the PI?s responsibility to describe how the collaboration(s) will augment his or her ability to address the research question. DoD FY14 GWIRP New Investigator Award 4 All applicants for the NIA must meet specific eligibility criteria under one of the following categories, as described in Section I.C., Eligibility Information. ? Transitioning Postdoctoral Fellow ? Early-Career Investigator ? New GWI Researcher The NIA is designed to promote new ideas in GWI research and establish proof-of-principle for further development in future studies. Applications are not required to include preliminary data; however, preliminary data may be used to support the objectives of an application. These data are not required to have come from the GWI research field. Applications not supported by preliminary data should be based on sound scientific rationale and may reflect clinical observations or seek to evaluate discoveries made in relation to other chronic multi-symptom illnesses for their application in GWI. Regardless of the approach, the focus should be clearly on veterans with GWI. It is the responsibility of the PI to clearly and explicitly articulate the project?s potential impact on GWI. The NIA supports research focusing on the complex of symptoms known as GWI, improving the case definition and diagnosis of GWI, characterizing disease symptoms, and better understanding the pathobiology. The NIA encourages basic through clinical research aimed at identification of objective measures (e.g., biomarkers) to distinguish healthy veterans from those with GWI, or improve understanding of the pathobiology underlying symptoms associated with GWI. Particular topic areas of interest include biological processes or abnormalities in GWI associated with: ? Central nervous system structure and function, in particular, the role of glial cells, astrocytes, and microglia in GWI symptomatology ? Central neuroinflammatory processes ? Autonomic nervous system function ? Neuroendocrine measures ? Immune parameters/Indicators of chronic infection ? Gastrointestinal complaints/symptoms ? Genetic, genomic, proteomic, or metabolic characteristics ? Respiratory symptoms ? Sexual dysfunction ? Sleep problems Applications may also address other topic areas that are directly relevant to GWI. Studies that characterize chronic effects of neurotoxic exposures at dosages comparable to that encountered in-theatre during the Gulf War are of interest. Studies using animal models should focus on long-term and latent effects of toxic exposures to closely represent the current status of GWI patients. All studies using animal models should use an established model unless there is a compelling scientific justification for the development or use of a new model. Development of new animal models is discouraged. The NIA can also be used for testing of GWI-targeted pharmacologic agents in Adsorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion (ADME) studies, and toxicology testing, including Investigational New Drug (IND)-enabling pharmacology/toxicology testing. Preclinical development of non-pharmacological interventions is also acceptable. All projects should adhere to a core set of standards for rigorous study design and reporting to maximize the reproducibility and translational potential of preclinical research. The standards are described in Landis, S.C. et al. A call for transparent reporting to optimize the predictive value of preclinical research. Nature 2012, 490:187-191 (www.nature.com/nature/journal/v490/n7419/full/nature11556.html). While these standards are written for preclinical studies, the basic principles of randomization, blinding, sample-size estimation, and data handling derive from well-established best practices in clinical studies. Applicants should consult the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines to ensure relevant aspects of rigorous animal research are adequately planned for and, ultimately, reported. The ARRIVE guidelines can be found at http://www.nc3rs.org.uk/page.asp?id=1357.

FY 2014 Community Assistance Program - State Support Services Element - Region 3

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: DHS-14-MT-023-003-99 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 97.023Eligible Applicants Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: DHS-DHS-R3Closing Date: Jul 01, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 52Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: Program Overview and Priorities a. Program Overview The Community Assistance Program ? State Support Services Element (CAP-SSSE) program provides funding to States to provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and to evaluate community performance in implementing NFIP floodplain management activities. b. Program Priorities In Fiscal Year 2014, the CAP-SSSE program will focus on compliance and enforcement. While map adoption, disaster activities, training and other assistance activities remain important components of the program?s overall community assistance strategy, a credible compliance and enforcement program is essential to meet the program?s goals of flood loss reduction. CAP-SSSE Eligible Activities and Requirements FEMA Regional Offices are to determine the appropriate levels of effort in each activity to ensure that performance metrics are being met. FEMA is requiring certain measures, and encouraging others, for some of the CAP-SSSE activities as described below. 1. Community Assistance Visits (CAV) and Community Assistance Contacts (CAC): States participating in CAP-SSSE are required to conduct CAVs and CACs. States will be required to incorporate the risk-based prioritization as described in the National Flood Insurance Program Guidance for Conducting Community Assistance Contacts and Community Assistance Visits. The Regions will work with each State to determine the number of CAVs and CACs to be conducted and to ensure that selection is based on the risk-based approach described above. Regions and States are encouraged to make maximum use of the CAC process and other contacts with communities to identify potential compliance problems and needs for technical assistance. The document also provides guidance in planning for, conducting and providing follow-up for these activities. States must provide appropriate follow-up to CAVs and CACs by providing technical assistance to correct program deficiencies and remedy violations to the maximum extent possible. States must coordinate with Regions, as necessary, to clarify what follow-up is to be provided. States are expected to refer community compliance problems that they are unable to resolve to the Regional Office. Headquarters staff will also be available for training at Regional CAP Conferences. All CAVs and CACs must be entered into CIS so that FEMA can monitor this important floodplain management activity. 2. Ordinance Assistance: Assisting communities in reviewing local ordinances to ensure compliance with NFIP requirements and adoption before Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) become effective is of paramount importance. This includes necessary ordinance revisions based upon new hazard data provided by FEMA, as well as incorporating any regulatory changes to meet minimum floodplain management criteria. State Cooperative Agreements shall include a performance measure relating to map adoption. The metric will measure the percentage of participating communities that have an adopted ordinance referencing the updated map by the FIRM effective date. States must include a mandatory map adoption rate of 93% or higher into their cooperative agreement. 3. Strategic Planning: Strategic Planning is an optional task and provides an opportunity to assess the current status of a State program and plan for future year demands, find efficiencies, and explore opportunities for expanded services. In cooperation with FEMA, the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) has developed a guidance document for strategic planning within State floodplain management programs. The guidance document can be found at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm and www.floods.org. 4. CAP Gap Analysis: States may optionally choose to conduct an annual gap analysis by using the CAP GAP tool provided at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/floodplain/fema_cap-ssse.shtm. The data collected in the annual analyses has been used to create budget justifications for the current funding. States who believe they may benefit from providing a more refined or revised GAP analysis may optionally submit this to the Region for future year consideration. The GAP analysis is also an important part of the strategic planning process and can be utilized by States in their planning efforts. 5. State Model Ordinance Updates and Monitoring of State Regulatory Environment: Most States have developed a State model floodplain management ordinance containing the minimum requirements outlined in 44 CFR Section 60.3, as well as any State required floodplain management provisions. In addition, States are encouraged to offer their communities model ordinances that include higher regulatory standards and assist communities to update their model ordinances to include higher standards. States are also encouraged to monitor legal issues affecting floodplain management regulations and activities related to State building code adoption and modifications. a. Model Building Codes: Many States adopt a building code that is based on one or more of the model codes developed by the International Code Council (the I-Codes) or the National Fire Protection Association. Most States require all or some communities to enforce the code. Unless modified by a State, the model codes contain NFIP-consistent provisions for buildings and structures. FEMA and States must ensure an understanding of the implications that the enforcement of these codes have on the local regulatory environment in order to provide accurate technical assistance. States should review their model ordinances and work with communities to ensure that they understand the implications of these codes and how they are enforced with respect to NFIP requirements. A model companion ordinance designed specifically to coordinate with building codes based on the I-Codes will be provided to the Regional Offices. State NFIP coordinators should coordinate with their counterparts in the State code commission or State agency that is responsible for the building code, especially with respect to interpretations that the code commission or State agency may be asked to issue. The Building Science Branch at FEMA Headquarters is available upon request to provide training on the flood provisions of the International Codes at Regional CAP Conferences. 6. Outreach, Workshops, and Other Training: States are encouraged to conduct outreach, workshops, and other training for local officials and other stakeholders, including insurance agents, lenders, adjustors, realtors, land surveyors, and design professionals to support implementation and enforcement of community floodplain management regulations, promotion of hazard identification, providing NFIP insurance training, and support of local and State planning initiatives. States should conduct workshops and other training and outreach opportunities on a schedule and at locations that are coordinated with the FEMA Region. Other Training a. ASFPM Activities and Credentialing: FEMA encourages State floodplain management personnel to attain Certified Floodplain Manager (CFM) credentials. State employees that are involved in floodplain management activities may use CAP-SSSE funds for costs associated with the initial exam and biennial CFM renewal fees. States are further encouraged to sponsor and proctor CFM exams in coordination with the ASFPM. Note: CAP- SSSE funding cannot be used to reimburse Individual ASFPM membership fees. At the discretion of the Region, States may use limited CAP-SSSE funding to allow local officials to attend and/or assist with the annual ASFPM conference held within their State. These costs must be negotiated with the Region as part of the annual agreement. b. CAP-SSSE funds may be used to reimburse travel costs associated with attendance by State floodplain management personnel at the ASFPM National Conference, FEMA Regional Office CAP-SSSE Coordination Meetings, and in-State Silver Jackets coordination meetings. Other national and regional meetings related to floodplain management may be considered for reimbursement if approved in advance by Regional Office CAP-SSSE staff. 7. General Technical Assistance: States should provide general technical assistance to communities and individuals to resolve floodplain management issues related to the NFIP. 8. Enrollment of Communities: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP by providing technical assistance to ensure the community meets the minimum eligibility requirements for participation. 9. Community Rating System (CRS) Support: States should assist communities in joining the NFIP Community Rating System (CRS) through providing general technical assistance, conducting entry CAVs and providing support for activities credited by CRS. 10. Mapping Coordination Assistance: As part of the Flood Map Modernization process and the FEMA Risk Map Initiative, States must work with the Regions to develop flood mapping priorities and participate in community meetings held as part of the mapping process. In addition to CAP-SSSE grants, States are eligible for Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) Program Management funding to meet these responsibilities. The CAP- SSSE plans must be developed separately from, but in coordination with, the CTP Program Management plans to ensure that CTP is used to complement CAP-SSSE activities and that States will meet all of their responsibilities under Flood Map Modernization and Risk Map. Neither CTP Program Management nor CAP-SSSE funds can be used for conducting floodplain studies or developing floodplain maps. However, several activities are allowable under both grant programs, including map adoption, training, and outreach. Use of these resources should be closely coordinated to prevent duplication of effort. 11. Coordination with Other State Programs and Agencies: States are encouraged to coordinate with other State administered programs that impact floodplain management such as the Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) that includes: Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, and Flood Mitigation Assistance Program. Additional coordination may include the State Dam Safety Program, State land- use, building code and water resources programs, as well as State agencies that routinely conduct activities within floodplains, such as State Departments of Transportation or port authorities. Coordination with other State agencies on adoption and implementation of State Executive Orders and regulations that meet State NFIP requirements is also encouraged. 12. Assistance to Communities in Responding to Disasters: States are encouraged to provide post-disaster assistance and support to NFIP communities. Examples of these activities include: technical assistance implementing substantial damage requirements, including use of the Substantial Damage Estimating Software; assistance to communities enrolling into the NFIP; general floodplain management technical assistance; assistance with the promotion and use of the NFIP Increased Cost of Compliance coverage; and assistance with HMA programs. Generally, these activities are not included in the annual CAP-SSSE Agreement, but can be negotiated when a disaster occurs. The CAP-SSSE Agreement must be modified to reflect these changes when they occur. Selection of CACs and CAVs A risk based approach is intended to help ensure that limited staff resources are applied to the communities most in need of a CAV or CAC in each fiscal year in a cost-effective manner. The selection of CACs and CAVs to be conducted shall continue to use the CAV Tier 1 Prioritization Tool as guidance for determining which communities should receive a CAV. While Selection of CAVs using the Tier 1 tool is required, States and regions may, by exception, select Tier 2 communities for CAVs, with justification added to the CAV Comment Field in the Community Information System (CIS). Special Attention to Mechanical, Electrical, and Utility Equipment and Flood Openings The NFIP Evaluation also concluded that the most common type of violation found in the Study?s quantitative assessment of building compliance were mechanical and utility equipment located below the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) and openings that do not meet requirements at 44 CFR 60.3(c)(5). Between them, these two types of violations accounted for 50 percent of the violations found within the sample. To improve enforcement of these requirements, special consideration and attention should be paid to mechanical, utility and openings requirements during CAVs. State CAVs In coordination with the State NFIP Coordinator, Regional Offices may determine that a CAV of the State floodplain management program is appropriate. Regional staff may request assistance with coordination with State agencies or officials, the collection of data and other assistance in preparation of conducting the CAV. c. Program Objectives ? To provide technical assistance to communities in the National Flood Insurance Program; and ? To evaluate community performance in implementing National Flood Insurance Program floodplain management activities

PPHF 2014: Cancer Prevention and Control Programs for State, Territorial and Tribal Organizations financed in part by 2014 Prevention and Public Health Funds

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-DP12-1205PPHF14 Opportunity Category: DiscretionaryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: HealthCFDA Number: 93.752Eligible Applicants Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)Agency Name: HHS-CDCClosing Date: Jun 09, 2014Award Ceiling: $0Expected Number of Awards: 0Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: N/A

Crossroads of the American Revolution Association, Inc.

Federal Grants (grants.gov) - Sun, 2014-07-06 03:16
Funding Opportunity Number: NPS-14-NERO-0021 Opportunity Category: MandatoryFunding Instrument Type: Cooperative AgreementCategory of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled "Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity" for clarification)CFDA Number: 15.939Eligible Applicants Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher educationAgency Name: DOI-NPSClosing Date: May 14, 2014Award Ceiling: $300,000Expected Number of Awards: 1Creation Date: May 08, 2014Funding Opportunity Description: This is NOT a request for applications; this is an announcement that an award has already been designated for Crossroads of the American Revolution Association, Inc. for their work on the Crossroads of the American Revolution National Heritage Area. The Crossroads of the American Revolution Association is responsible for the following: 1. Use funds made available under this Agreement to support the NHA in a manner consistent with the Legislation and as outlined in Annual Work Plans and Budgets for projects on Operations and Development Projects, Management Planning, Interpretation and Education, and Site Preservation; 2. Include units of local government, regional planning organizations, and nonprofit organizations in implementing the approved management plan; 3. Encourage, by appropriate means economic viability that is consistent with the purposes of the NHC; and 4. Comply with all applicable State and Federal laws, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act.
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